The Time is Now to Hold Big Pharma Accountable! Do Not Let Purdue Pharma Get Away With MURDER …File Today!

The Time is Now to Hold Big Pharma Accountable! Do Not Let Purdue Pharma Get Away With MURDER …File Today!

A very important message from Ryan Hampton as I and many advocates support all he has accomplished against PURDUE the maker of Opioid drugs causing overdoses and those becoming ADDICTED…

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Dear Friends,

It has been a long time coming but there is now a legal team of experts fighting for victims and people impacted by the opioid crisis and Purdue Pharma.

This morning, I filed a claim with the legal team against Purdue Pharma–which declared bankruptcy on Sunday night. I encourage each and every one of you to do the same. Any money recovered under my personal claim against Purdue, I am dedicating 100% to support solutions in prevention, treatment, harm reduction, and recovery support services in my community.

To file a claim against Purdue in the bankruptcy, visit opioidrights.com.
Time is of the essence.

Why it’s important that every single person impacted by the harm of Purdue’s products files a claim

In 1996, Purdue received an FDA approval for OxyContin, an extended-release form of oxycodone that the company claimed was safer than others and had a low risk of addiction. OxyContin, however, had a high risk of addiction.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, out of 700,000 Americans who died from drug overdoses from 1999 to 2017, almost 400,000 died after overdosing on prescription and illicit opioid drugs. During the one year period from Jan. 2, 2016 to Jan. 1, 2017, 64,070 people died from opioid overdoses.

In addition to OxyContin, Purdue manufactured MS Contin, Dilaudid/Dilaudid HP, Butrans, Hysingla ER, and Targiniq ER, all of which are also at the epicenter of the crisis.

Purdue and Big Pharma are alleged to have helped to drive the opioid epidemic by engaging in aggressive and potentially misleading marketing campaigns.

Purdue purportedly mounted an especially aggressive marketing campaign for OxyContin, holding dozens of national pain conferences that were attended by more than 5,000 pharmacists, doctors, and nurses to spur them to prescribe OxyContin for non-cancer pain.

The marketing efforts seem to have worked. The number of prescriptions for OxyContin to treat non-cancer pain grew from 670,000 in 1997 to 6.2 million in 2002. By 2020, the U.S. market for opioid medications is expected to reach $18.4 billion.

On September 15, 2019, Purdue filed for bankruptcy.

In the near future, the legal team anticipates that a federal bankruptcy court handling the matter will set a deadline within which claims can be filed by victims and those alleging injury or death from Purdue products. Claims not filed within the applicable bar date may be lost forever.

What does filing a claim mean?


Filing a claim means you will be represented as a victim of Purdue’s actions during the bankruptcy proceedings and will have legal representation in the process.

About the legal team fighting for victims of the opioid crisis

Andrews & Thornton, ASK LLP, Fennemore Craig PC, and Goodnow McKay PLLC, have significant experience with tort, mass tort, and wrongful death matters. In addition, Anne Andrews, the managing partner of Andrews & Thornton, has considerable experience navigating bankruptcies involving complicated pharmaceutical claims.

She served on official committees in TwinLab and N.V.E., both dietary supplement companies responsible for causing serious injuries to consumers, and as the Chair of the Official Committee of Unsecured Creditors in New England Compounding Pharmacy, a company responsible for distributing compounded steroid injections that caused fungal meningitis.

She also participated in bankruptcy proceedings on behalf of tort creditors in Chemtura (which sold a chemical in flavored popcorn causing severe lung injury), Metabolife and MuscleTech (also dietary supplement companies causing users severe injuries like a heart attack or stroke), and Dow Corning (which marketed faulty breast implants).

Most recently she has served on the Tort Claimants’ Committee in PG&E, a bankruptcy involving tens of thousands of people losing their homes or lives due to PG&E’s electrical equipment. Significantly, she currently serves as the Chair of Creditor’s Committee for the bankruptcy of Insys, the first opioid seller to declare bankruptcy.

Please file your claim TODAY. The process is simple.
Go to: opioidrights.com.


Thank you for all you do. ~Ryan Hampton

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Please file your claim TODAY. I have and urge you -all my Recovery Advocates and Recovery Friends to do the same! ~Advocate Catherine Lyon


Let The Legal Team Fight for Victims…

The opioid epidemic has ravaged the country, leading to countless deaths and injuries. With news breaking about Purdue Pharma, the maker of Oxycontin and other deadly opioids, filing for bankruptcy, our group of law firms has come together to represent individuals who have been injured and the families of those who have lost their lives because of opioids. For cases, we accept there are no out-of-pocket costs, and we only get paid if we recover money for you.*

Call now or visit HERE: YOUR RIGHTS! AND fill out the form for a free case evaluation.

Purdue Needs To Be Held Accountable For The Opioid Epidemic!

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Please also visit Ryan’s New Website too! Recovery Advocate Project

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Action Network

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A Holiday Message and Special Guest Article By My Dear Friend Always In ACTION and Solutions! …Ryan Hampton!

A Holiday Message and Special Guest Article By My Dear Friend Always In ACTION and Solutions! …Ryan Hampton!


No Introduction Needed and Straight to THE POINT! By, Ryan Hampton, Advocate.
(Courtesy of Action Network and my Ryan Hampton Newsletter)

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America’s crisis isn’t opioids—it’s ignorance – by Ryan Hampton


“I grew up in Florida, within miles of the epicenter of what we now call a national opioid crisis.”

I got hooked on prescription painkillers in Florida, buying green and blue tablets from the pill mills that spread through Miami. I learned to shoot heroin in Florida. I ate at the homeless shelters there, begged for change at the gas stations, and tried one treatment center after another. I experienced the opioid crisis up close and personal: I lived it.

After leaving Florida in 2013 and finding sustained recovery four years ago in California, I’m still experiencing the effects of the epidemic. Now, I see it from the other side. I work in policy, pushing for recovery-related reform at the national level. I work hand-in-hand with grassroots groups across the nation to ensure that our voices are heard. This year, I’ve learned that if recovery is not represented at the decision-making table, it quickly falls by the wayside.

I’m able to be such a vocal activist in part because I’m white. I’m the guy in the Warby Parker glasses, the hoodie, and the backpack, trying to force change everywhere I go. I see few advocates of color at the table and at higher levels of leadership — especially when funding is in play. I do my best, but I can’t speak for a community I’m not part of. I can call out systematic problems that exclude people who are in need.

The fact is, in our focus on fixing America’s “opioid problem,” we’ve fallen into the same old ignorant patterns. White, suburban, middle-class opioid users are receiving an overwhelming amount of media attention. People who look like me are in the limelight: the addiction crisis is hot right now, but only certain aspects of it actually make it to the mainstream.

We’ve ignored communities of color, alternate pathways to recovery, harm reduction, and substances other than opioids. As a result, meth is on the rise, as well as benzos such as Xanax. Well-intentioned advocacy from both policy leaders and grassroots groups have actually created more victims because it fails to include all people with substance use disorder.

The divide between policy and the day-to-day struggle of people in active addiction is widening. Who cares what legal protections we have if they don’t actually save lives? What’s the point of creating progressive health care systems if those systems aren’t accessible to everyone who needs them?

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First Steps Help 3

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Furthermore, the media misrepresents small steps forward as the “finish line” while sensationalizing opioid use in specific regions. Instead of becoming more inclusive, our definition of recovery is narrowing. That squeezes out the most vulnerable members of our communities, while those with more privilege—who fit the mold of the “model addict”—get sympathy and support on their journeys to wellness. That means that, on the same day, a headline about the opioid crisis in Appalachia shares a page with a story about Senate leadership unanimously backing the new opioid bills. It doesn’t make sense.

These stories are linked. They are one and the same. The average addict looks nothing like the rural poor of West Virginia—the drug epidemic affects one in three American homes. Yet, just as the media chose to sensationalize the crack epidemic as a “black problem,” addiction is once again becoming “someone else’s problem.” When we see addiction represented as something that happens to other people, we don’t deal with the problem that’s in our own backyards, living rooms, and classrooms.

Yet, there are examples of people working hard to address the crisis without shame, stigma, or discrimination. Dayton, Ohio recently made headlines for cutting its overdose rate in half by focusing on giving help freely, to anyone who needed it. The city removed barriers to treatment by investing in public health, supporting harm reduction measures like fentanyl test kits and clean syringes, and offering diverse options for recovery support.

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Miami, Florida, Cityscape, Water

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Miami-Dade County in Florida – –

The place where I hit the bottom of my addiction—is making incredible strides too, by making naloxone available literally everywhere and putting it in the hands of people who already use opioids. The county is also the home of the state’s first and only syringe exchange program. These two places are reversing the opioid epidemic by treating it like a public health crisis—and not shutting out people in need because they “don’t fit” the way we see addiction in the media or in budgeting meetings. Instead of assuming that a rising tide of recovery will lift all boats, they decided to build a boat that has a seat for everyone.

This year, the drug crisis worsened, even as we made incredible strides forward in leadership, policy, and breaking the stigma of addiction. Clearly, what we’re doing isn’t working broadly, for people of diverse backgrounds and needs. We can’t leave them behind and then pat ourselves on the back. We need to look at movements like AIDS activism and focus on helping people survive. Not just white people, not just straight people, not just wealthy people, not just employed people, not just housed people. All people.

I’m as guilty as the next person of losing sight of that goal. I, too, spent a lot of this year focused on opioids, and how they affected only the people I know. In 2019, I want to do better. We have a larger problem than opioids: we have a problem with our perception of addiction, our education about the illness and our response to this crisis. That includes the community of pain patients who are being pushed out of the discussion on opioids and penalized by stricter prescribing guidelines. In fact, we can find common ground between recovery advocates and pain patients, instead of leaving anyone on the sidelines.

This is not a problem that can be solved by separating and specializing it to death. We have the data, the tools, and the evidence that are proven to work. We need to use them and make them accessible by actually meeting people where they are.

In 2019, I’m committing to making harm reduction and saving all lives my focus. You can’t help someone if they’re dead. All the well-crafted legislation in the world won’t bring back the fathers, mothers, and children who we’ve lost to drug-related causes. What we can do is bring help to those in need. We can give them their dignity. We can see them from the other side of the crisis, and meet them wherever they are.

“The issue isn’t opioids: it’s ignorance. What are we actually trying to fix? Are we solving the problem, or simply eliminating the people we don’t think deserve help?” … I’ve looked at this epidemic from both sides. I know where I stand.

I hope others will stand with me and lend their voices to a movement that includes everyone and offers real, meaningful solutions. This doesn’t have to be complicated. Simple measures like making naloxone widely available, offering 24/7 access to safe injection sites with fentanyl test kits and clean syringes, and connecting people with help the minute they need it ensures that they can get through 2019 alive. Together. In one piece, recovered.

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Ryan Hampton is a person in recovery from heroin addiction and author of “American Fix: Inside the Opioid Addiction Crisis—and How to End It,” published by St. Martin’s Press.

He’s a nationally recognized activist and founder of the nonprofit advocacy organization The Voices Project.