Meet Tiffy Rose. She Is The Author of Her Debut Release “The Big Trap: Just One last High.” Interview Courtesy ~ Off The Record …

Meet Tiffy Rose. She Is The Author of Her Debut Release “The Big Trap: Just One last High.” Interview Courtesy ~ Off The Record …

Hello and Welcome Recovery Friends and Visitors,

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Please meet my special recovery friend Tiffy Rose and she is also a fellow author as well! She is about to release her second book soon, but I have her first book on my “Goodreads List” and is my next book to read. I have been hearing some amazing book news of her debut release titled “The Big Trap: Just One Last High.”

And cannot wait to begin reading it. I decided this year I am going to start sharing more recovery authors and the books they write just as I do over on my “Cat Lyon’s Reading & Den Blog” 

I hope you all will support Tiffy by ordering a copy and make sure you leave a review on Amazon like I will when finished … I hope you enjoy learning more about her!

~Catherine Townsend-Lyon, Author/Advocate

 

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MEET AUTHOR T. ROSE and INTERVIEW by “Off The Record”

 

First off, tell me about yourself?

I am a mom of two; my daughter has two boys and one girl. My son has two girls and they all are the light that warms my heart daily even when I am unable to see them.  I love gardening around the house I bought 4 years ago, a gift to myself on my twelve-year Sobriety anniversary. I also enjoy sitting at my favorite restaurant Oceanside and staring out over the expanse of the ocean to the horizon reflecting on how grateful I am for the life I have today.

I am blessed with over sixteen years in recovery, after a twenty-five-year addiction to cocaine. I am a Recovery Advocate and Life Coach helping those still struggling to find their way through the waters of recovery and the entire stigma that comes along with being an addict. Writing has become a meaningful and deeply satisfying way to meet others and fulfill a strong conviction to help other souls on their life journey.

 


What made you want to become a writer?

I began writing my personal story to explore and understand my life events and make sense of ‘the how and why’ things happened as they did, and the how and why I became addicted to cocaine. A simple daily journal I had begun writing early in my recovery as a self-therapy tool, ultimately became the framework for The Big trap. From what appeared at first a random array of unconnected personal life events and impulsive choices, steadily emerged recognition of interconnectedness and cause and effect of my addiction and the life I had chosen to maintain it.

Writing out the steps and then later reading professional psychology and addiction literature revealed commonalities between myself and others I had known in and out of recovery and I began to strongly believe I could offer something of timely value and benefit to those in need. The question of why I believed I could and should write a recovery book was answered by the majority of people I had shared some part of my story with over the years who lamented, “You should write a book. Thousands need help.” They were right and I knew there was no turning back and a writer was born.

 

Tell me about your book The Big Trap: Just One Last High?

The Big Trap is a metaphor for addiction maintenance. Addicts telling themselves and wanting to believe it as well, the immediate act of getting high right now is this last one, the last high, and then no more, we stop. The story recounts my life events from earliest childhood memories and facts I could accurately verify as the path, the stepping-stones more or less, to my ultimate addiction. It reveals early traumatic events, the horrors of abuse I suffered within an extended alcoholic family, and being a child rape victim. It illuminates the subtlety of neglect, isolation, and the harsh environments to create lifelong conflicts and anxieties that untreated or ignored undermine normal healthy development and often result in efforts to self-medicate that are far too often the origins of destructive addiction.

I engaged that path as a teenager with alcohol and followed with marijuana, largely at first because it reduced the mental anguish and softened the effects of physical injuries. Ultimately, my judgment being too poorly developed to be wary of the seemingly perfect man I later married and trusted to protect me, introduced me to cocaine after self-imposed abstinence from alcohol and weed had steadily improved my life quality. He said; “Just once, just try it please… if you love me you will just once.”  

I was hooked without any idea of how powerful and life-altering the shiny little lines of white was. Up to that point, my earnest efforts to be a good wife while being the successful career woman at the forefront of the emerging personal computer revolution were extremely productive and financially rewarding and the book illuminates the good and bad choices so many of us make and why.


I had worked my way through college while holding down a full-time job by night to become the sole woman Electrician and Electronic Technician in a male-dominated field. Within the picture-perfect family life and career of two professional go-getters moving up that everyone on the outside looking in only seen two functioning addicts hiding the big secret. Casual occasional recreational coke use had steadily become addiction chaos and all the success tumbles down line by line within a year of that first fiery nose burning line.


The monster of more and more drugs took over landing me on the streets for ten years chasing… more! It takes the reader through the days and nights of those living our here, dealing drugs, using drugs and all the violence it holds. After multiple overdoses and seizures almost daily in the end, it was that last trip to jail that I realized I needed to stop. I requested the in-house jail rehab program for my housing stay during that one-year sentence and began what is today my complete recovery.

 

How do you feel it was received?

The reviews I have received from those who have read my book are great, I’m grateful that I was able to touch them with a story that gives a clear picture of the destruction addiction causes and the hope that can be found in recovery.

 

Now that it’s published would you do anything different or change anything?

I have changed some of the verbiage in the current edition that is available. In the first edition, the scenes where the rapes occur were much more violent and they have been toned down to allow placement in Juvenile Detention Centers, Adult jail facilities, Rehab Centers, and Sober Living Houses as aids and facilitation tools, as well as useful guidance in an easy good reading format.

 

I believe you self-published; tell me about that and more about why you went down the self-publishing route?

Yes, I did publish my own book, though I didn’t use the traditional self-publishing route. I created my own publishing business, Tiffy Rose LLC-Publishing, for the current title and those in the process and those planned.  I chose this route after I tried the traditional way of publishing my work without success. I did like so many others send out hundreds of query letters to Literary agents but I received either no response or agents telling me these types of stories are rarely picked up by the mainstream publishing houses.

At 56 years old I determined I didn’t have the luxury of time to wait for unknown people or entities to decide my book was worth their time and investment, so I invested in myself and away I went self-taught into the book publishing arena. I bought the required legal copyright and distribution marking criteria, the publishing software and here I am. Like a Publisher and owner, it allows me access to placement anywhere worldwide, and owning the copyrights I don’t have to worry about who else gets a say in where it goes from here.

 

Have you written anything else and if so where can people find it?

I am now in the final stages of finishing up my second book as a sequel to Trapped. The Big Trap is more about how I got there and the second book is about, how I and others make it back. It is focused essentially on the steps of recovery and sobriety and how to get there and stay. I illuminate the variety of myths and pitfalls of outdated perceptions of addiction and how harmful they can be if taken as gospel when current research and subject trails define newer methods of treatment that are more often effective short term and long.

My sixteen years in recovery I utilize to define how to search out well hidden or ignored cause/effect relationships that often underlie the addiction cycle and how to navigate the problems every addict trying to recover likely will encounter. I explore how to deal with many types of stigma and discrimination usually encountered and the tools I have learned along the way to share with others trying to find the right recovery path and its steps and conquer the obstacles.  A third book, a true life mystery has been outlined and I will publish it in early 2020.

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The Big Trap: Just One Last High!

About The Book ~ The Big Trap: Just one last High
Details:

  • Print Length: 206 pages
  • Publisher: Tiffy Rose LLC; 2 editions (March 5, 2018)
  • Publication Date: March 18, 2018
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B07B8WS8PD

How does a demure hard-working young Southern Belle climbing the corporate ladder at the forefront of the computer revolution get trapped in the dark underworld of drugs, crime, and prostitution?

This is the true story of Tiffany Rose Baker’s long journey from the hot West Texas plains to the executive boardroom by day and the shimmering club scene by night in sunny South Florida. Smile with her as years of dedication and hard work conquer the highest mountains and cry with her when misplaced trust and a line of cocaine leads to the depth of despair and self-destruction.

The Big Trap is an intense and thought-provoking examination of the dark secretive world of drugs and vice and the high price of substance abuse.

The Big Trap… Just One Last High, is the voice of one but the story of many who live day and night in the shadows of a pharmaceutical wasteland.

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A Message From The Author:

“I wrote the Big Trap as an extension of my research into the how and why I became addicted and stayed high about twenty-five years. It wasn’t enough to just know, I wanted to fully understand with certainty because at the time I first got straight again I wasn’t at all sure I would stay that way.  If one person gains control over substance abuse destroying their lives, or if only one person gains insights into their own path to certain success from The Big Trap, then my journey to the bottom and back and sharing it with others has purpose and power.”

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Feel free to Connect with Author, Tiffy Rose on Social Media …
#engagethesolution

Website:  https://www.tiffyrose1recovery.com
Facebook-Personal: https://www.facebook.com/tiffy.rose.984
Facebook-Publishing: https://www.facebook.com/tiffyrose1recovery
Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/Rose_recovery
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/t.rose.rcvry
Medium: https://www.medium.com/@tiffyrose1recovery

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My Dear Friend Tony Kelly Makes a Difference With Gambling Awareness in The Uk. A Former Professional Soccer Player … His Story in The Daily Star

My Dear Friend Tony Kelly Makes a Difference With Gambling Awareness in The Uk. A Former Professional Soccer Player … His Story in The Daily Star

Happy Coming New Year and I Welcome You All!

Meet my very Special Guest, Article, and Story of My UK Friend and Loud Advocate -Tony Kelly …

I have been blessed to have many several former professional pro sports friends who maintain recovery like myself and Tony as we are Loud Advocates in sharing help and hope to others looking to recover too! Tony is one of those advocates in the UK and through his  Red Card organization.

Tony and I meet through social media and due to his book about his gambling addiction and recovery. It is an amazing book to read as he gives an in-depth look at how Sports Pro’s can and have become addicted or have a problem with gambling and with other types of addictions like my friends former NLF pro’s Randy Grimes and Vance Johnson and several others. We Do Recover! ~Catherine Townsend-Lyon, Author/Advocate

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Tony Kelly’s amazing comeback, Man Utd in Valencia, Chelsea fans … JEREMY CROSS COLUMN …UK Daily Star 

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“TONY KELLY’S life once sunk so low that he plotted to rob a bank.”

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“Tony became the youngest ever player in the Bristol City first team at the age of 16 before being snapped up as a pro by Stoke City His career spanned from the highs of scoring a last-minute goal against Liverpool at Anfield in the 1991 League Cup to the lows of suffering from racial abuse.  Despite hanging up his boots in 1999, at the age of 35, his gambling demons were still a part of his life as nothing had prepared him for how to deal with his addiction.”

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Daily Star – Dec. 17th, 2018 – By Jeremy Cross

He sat down with his brother, of all people, to pick the branch he intended to steal from, the tools he would use (a knife) and what was the best time to strike.

And the reason for contemplating such utter madness? Gambling.

It had taken such a tight grip on him that he felt he had no other option but to take desperate steps to settle some of his debts.

Chances are he won’t be alone in having reached such a low point.

But what makes Kelly’s story particularly worth hearing, is that he has not only survived his addiction, but he is now using his experiences to educate others on the perils and dangers of a problem that is like cancer sweeping through society.

Last month, this column examined the role of gambling in sport and took to task golfers Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson for their vulgar head-to-head in Las Vegas.

That prompted Kelly to get in touch and this column makes no apology for returning to the subject.

He was once a professional footballer with a bright future. Alan Ball signed him for Stoke and he had the potential to have it all.

But instead, he blew it – $500,000 to be precise.

As well as the money, he also lost his partner and children, was forced to declare himself bankrupt in 2010 and was verging on suicidal.

In the end, his faith saved him and the devout Christian has used his second chance in life to become a power of good, steering youngsters away from the path he once trod.

Image result for copy free images UK former soccer player tony kelly

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With lottery funding, Kelly and his eight-strong team that includes addiction specialists, have been able to stage regular workshops for schools and other organizations across London, aimed at promoting gambling awareness and educating people about the dangers.

Earlier this month he met with Marc Etches, chief executive officer of ‘GambleAware’ to see if the two organizations could work in tandem to lobby the Government about the unacceptable levels of betting advertising in and around football.

He also took the trouble to voice his concerns with a leading betting firm and thought he had held constructive talks, but hasn’t heard a peep back from them since.

Kelly pulls no punches when it comes to talking about his problems and the potential ones facing those who think gambling is nothing more than a bit of fun.

He said:
“I was in denial. I felt like an embarrassment and didn’t know if there was any help out there for me.”

“Somehow I survived. The turning point was the plan to rob a bank and speaking with my brother and sister. Looking back now, it sounds absolutely crazy, but at the time I just thought ‘how the hell am I going to get out of this?’

“I guess I wasn’t meant to go down that road. I regained my faith, got christened, spoke to therapists, decided to write the book and then set-up the Project to stage the workshops.

“I feel lucky to be able to do this. People try to commit suicide because of gambling every single day. You feel so isolated and alone. These days the slogan is ‘when the fun stops, stop’, but people can’t stop. That’s the problem.”

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The point is that those today with problems like he once had are not alone.

Kelly speaks to kids as young as 11 and knows children and teenagers are the most vulnerable.

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Yavneh College

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He added: “Football stars are their heroes. But with all the advertising at grounds and on shirts, kids are being exposed to something. They have no idea of what the ramifications of gambling can be.

“They have sites right there on apps on their phones, while advertising isn’t regulated properly.

“All the promotion and advertising of gambling needs to be scaled down. There has to be a balance. It all boils down to awareness.”

Kelly has just applied for the second round of £10,000 funding from the Lottery, is hoping to get some financial backing from ‘GambleAware’ and has set his sights on taking his workshops around the UK.

As a reminder of where he’s come from, he still carries with him his bankruptcy files from when he stood ashamed in the High Court.

It was a long, dark tunnel but Kelly has transformed himself from a failure to an inspiration . . .

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Tesco

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For more details go to
 kellysredcardconsultancy.co.uk

Visit Our Page To Meet The Red Card Team!

Christmas Day Recovery Ramblin’s, Reflections, and Advocacy … Be That One, But Carefully …

Christmas Day Recovery Ramblin’s, Reflections, and Advocacy … Be That One, But Carefully …

Welcome Everyone Who Finds Me and My Recovery Blog Today ~ Merry Christmas!

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So I happen to do a Facebook Post yesterday that gave me some things I’d been pondering for a while as I was reading in many of my recovery groups how relapse and struggles have been shared about and by trying to help others looking for help. And like addicts, we can have roadblocks during the holiday season. But one area that hit home for me was swirling in my head from my own past early recovery days … “Being Of Service To Others” and Advocacy. So I thought I’d share and elaborate a little more from my post. 

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Facebook Asks? What’s On Your Mind This Christmas Day?


Hear It Is … A Recovery Message We At Times Need 2 HEAR …

 

NEXT Month on Jan. 29th, 2019 I will have maintained my recovery 12-years.  No “Ego” nor Bragging about this at all.

Why Am I Sharing This?

Because I chose that date as my actual recovery date as it was my “Sentencing Date” by a Judge in So. Oregon who Gave ME A Blessing of a 2ND CHANCE from a crime I had committed and so it would not follow me the rest of my life once I completed all of the punishment given was satisfied …

I Had Never Committed a Crime before, nor after this crime, but I wanted this “Recovery Date” even though I had some time already, BUT? I didn’t want to Never Forget the Poor Choices I had made through all the years within my gambling addiction and abuse of alcohol …

We all have wreckage and baggage from #Addiction.

But when I began Advocating and Raising Awareness about Addicted and Problem Gambling, I too right away wanted to “Be of Service” and help reach out to those suffering as I had.

YOU CAN’T DO IT if your not solid in your OWN Recovery as it CAN be stressful and a Quik source of #Relapse as most who are reaching out are in CRISIS MODE …

I am sharing this because RELAPSE CAN and DOES HAPPEN.  Especially around the holidays. But those with under a YEAR or TWO of Firm, Solid Recovery Time, has done Inner Work, and underlying issues addressed? That has to come first.

There are many ways and phases to be of recovery service. IF YOUR Not 100%? But, how can YOU BE 100% for someone needing or reaching out for help and maybe in crisis?

YES, I Know, It’s in our nature to want to help …you can refer them to someone who can. You can share treatment resources, even connect them to someone that has longer-term recovery or is a Certified Advocate, Recovery Coach, or Interventionist who can make some calls for an open bed, or you can even take them to a recovery meeting.

I do Advocate, and I had a couple mishaps that made me relapse a time or two when only 90 days to 6 months into my journey. But today I chose to do it through sponsoring others, through my book,  through my recovery blog, by email, phone, and of course, through social media and lend my skills as a marketer and promoter of recovery events.

Would I love to be out speaking more, going to conferences, Keynote speaking, or meeting those who need or are reaching out for help?
OF Course! But my mental health disorders don’t give the option or pleasure in doing so. Well,  PLAN B …

I Always Say; 

“Someone needs to be there to answer the emails, answer the phone, or be ready when people reach out through social media or even through my blog.”

DON’T LET anyone discount how you choose to Advocate with and for others when you’ve maintained long-term recovery … Just make sure you are solid and have some long-term recovery or it can be a source of relapse …

Doing Advocacy Work Is Not About a Popularity Contest or Who Has The Most Facebook Likes or Followers … NOT When People Are Dying Out Here From Addictions 

GOD Knows My Heart and It’s In The Right Place  🙏👏🙏😉

PSSST – Stop by my other “Passion” … Books and my Fine Authors I promote if you love reading!  “Cat Lyon’s Reading and Writing Den”

 

Catherine Townsend-Lyon – Recovery Advocate/Author 

 

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A Holiday Message and Special Guest Article By My Dear Friend Always In ACTION and Solutions! …Ryan Hampton!

A Holiday Message and Special Guest Article By My Dear Friend Always In ACTION and Solutions! …Ryan Hampton!


No Introduction Needed and Straight to THE POINT! By, Ryan Hampton, Advocate.
(Courtesy of Action Network and my Ryan Hampton Newsletter)

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America’s crisis isn’t opioids—it’s ignorance – by Ryan Hampton


“I grew up in Florida, within miles of the epicenter of what we now call a national opioid crisis.”

I got hooked on prescription painkillers in Florida, buying green and blue tablets from the pill mills that spread through Miami. I learned to shoot heroin in Florida. I ate at the homeless shelters there, begged for change at the gas stations, and tried one treatment center after another. I experienced the opioid crisis up close and personal: I lived it.

After leaving Florida in 2013 and finding sustained recovery four years ago in California, I’m still experiencing the effects of the epidemic. Now, I see it from the other side. I work in policy, pushing for recovery-related reform at the national level. I work hand-in-hand with grassroots groups across the nation to ensure that our voices are heard. This year, I’ve learned that if recovery is not represented at the decision-making table, it quickly falls by the wayside.

I’m able to be such a vocal activist in part because I’m white. I’m the guy in the Warby Parker glasses, the hoodie, and the backpack, trying to force change everywhere I go. I see few advocates of color at the table and at higher levels of leadership — especially when funding is in play. I do my best, but I can’t speak for a community I’m not part of. I can call out systematic problems that exclude people who are in need.

The fact is, in our focus on fixing America’s “opioid problem,” we’ve fallen into the same old ignorant patterns. White, suburban, middle-class opioid users are receiving an overwhelming amount of media attention. People who look like me are in the limelight: the addiction crisis is hot right now, but only certain aspects of it actually make it to the mainstream.

We’ve ignored communities of color, alternate pathways to recovery, harm reduction, and substances other than opioids. As a result, meth is on the rise, as well as benzos such as Xanax. Well-intentioned advocacy from both policy leaders and grassroots groups have actually created more victims because it fails to include all people with substance use disorder.

The divide between policy and the day-to-day struggle of people in active addiction is widening. Who cares what legal protections we have if they don’t actually save lives? What’s the point of creating progressive health care systems if those systems aren’t accessible to everyone who needs them?

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First Steps Help 3

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Furthermore, the media misrepresents small steps forward as the “finish line” while sensationalizing opioid use in specific regions. Instead of becoming more inclusive, our definition of recovery is narrowing. That squeezes out the most vulnerable members of our communities, while those with more privilege—who fit the mold of the “model addict”—get sympathy and support on their journeys to wellness. That means that, on the same day, a headline about the opioid crisis in Appalachia shares a page with a story about Senate leadership unanimously backing the new opioid bills. It doesn’t make sense.

These stories are linked. They are one and the same. The average addict looks nothing like the rural poor of West Virginia—the drug epidemic affects one in three American homes. Yet, just as the media chose to sensationalize the crack epidemic as a “black problem,” addiction is once again becoming “someone else’s problem.” When we see addiction represented as something that happens to other people, we don’t deal with the problem that’s in our own backyards, living rooms, and classrooms.

Yet, there are examples of people working hard to address the crisis without shame, stigma, or discrimination. Dayton, Ohio recently made headlines for cutting its overdose rate in half by focusing on giving help freely, to anyone who needed it. The city removed barriers to treatment by investing in public health, supporting harm reduction measures like fentanyl test kits and clean syringes, and offering diverse options for recovery support.

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Miami, Florida, Cityscape, Water

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Miami-Dade County in Florida – –

The place where I hit the bottom of my addiction—is making incredible strides too, by making naloxone available literally everywhere and putting it in the hands of people who already use opioids. The county is also the home of the state’s first and only syringe exchange program. These two places are reversing the opioid epidemic by treating it like a public health crisis—and not shutting out people in need because they “don’t fit” the way we see addiction in the media or in budgeting meetings. Instead of assuming that a rising tide of recovery will lift all boats, they decided to build a boat that has a seat for everyone.

This year, the drug crisis worsened, even as we made incredible strides forward in leadership, policy, and breaking the stigma of addiction. Clearly, what we’re doing isn’t working broadly, for people of diverse backgrounds and needs. We can’t leave them behind and then pat ourselves on the back. We need to look at movements like AIDS activism and focus on helping people survive. Not just white people, not just straight people, not just wealthy people, not just employed people, not just housed people. All people.

I’m as guilty as the next person of losing sight of that goal. I, too, spent a lot of this year focused on opioids, and how they affected only the people I know. In 2019, I want to do better. We have a larger problem than opioids: we have a problem with our perception of addiction, our education about the illness and our response to this crisis. That includes the community of pain patients who are being pushed out of the discussion on opioids and penalized by stricter prescribing guidelines. In fact, we can find common ground between recovery advocates and pain patients, instead of leaving anyone on the sidelines.

This is not a problem that can be solved by separating and specializing it to death. We have the data, the tools, and the evidence that are proven to work. We need to use them and make them accessible by actually meeting people where they are.

In 2019, I’m committing to making harm reduction and saving all lives my focus. You can’t help someone if they’re dead. All the well-crafted legislation in the world won’t bring back the fathers, mothers, and children who we’ve lost to drug-related causes. What we can do is bring help to those in need. We can give them their dignity. We can see them from the other side of the crisis, and meet them wherever they are.

“The issue isn’t opioids: it’s ignorance. What are we actually trying to fix? Are we solving the problem, or simply eliminating the people we don’t think deserve help?” … I’ve looked at this epidemic from both sides. I know where I stand.

I hope others will stand with me and lend their voices to a movement that includes everyone and offers real, meaningful solutions. This doesn’t have to be complicated. Simple measures like making naloxone widely available, offering 24/7 access to safe injection sites with fentanyl test kits and clean syringes, and connecting people with help the minute they need it ensures that they can get through 2019 alive. Together. In one piece, recovered.

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Ryan Hampton is a person in recovery from heroin addiction and author of “American Fix: Inside the Opioid Addiction Crisis—and How to End It,” published by St. Martin’s Press.

He’s a nationally recognized activist and founder of the nonprofit advocacy organization The Voices Project.

 

 

Holiday Depression Is Real~ Dispelling The Myths About Them By Guest Jake M.

Holiday Depression Is Real~ Dispelling The Myths About Them By Guest Jake M.

 

Depression is a commonly misunderstood illness and more so when you are maintaining recovery from addiction … For an illness that affects an estimated 300 million people, there is a surprising number of people who don’t understand what it is or don’t even believe it exists. It has been said that the chance of a person knowing someone who struggles with depression is over 90 percent! For this reason, it is a good idea to know what depression is — and what it isn’t — so that we can better understand our friends and relatives who struggle with depression.

 

There are a lot of misconceptions about depression. From not being a real illness to depression being an inherited trait, some common beliefs that people have about depression are wildly inaccurate. In an effort to prepare all of us to better understand the people in our lives who struggle with depression, here is a guide that will help to dispel some of the most common myths about depression.

 

“Depression Isn’t a Real Illness”

First and foremost is the very common and unsettling belief that depression isn’t a real illness. In some studies, it was found that over 60% of those who were asked considered depression to be a mindset that is all in your head, and that an effective treatment for depression is simply to “pull yourself together.”

 

Depression is a real illness caused by chemical imbalances in the brain. Very seldom is it caused by the victim wallowing in sadness and self-pity, but is, in fact, a biological disorder that needs to be taken as seriously as any other physical injury would be. Just as we would not tell someone with a broken leg, “It’s all in your leg! Just walk it off,” it would be just as inappropriate to tell someone who is struggling with depression that it is all in their head and that they should pull themselves together. Especially when women have hormone changes through life.

Dispelling Common Myths About Depression (2)

“Depression is Just Sadness”

A common misconception about depression is that it is simply sadness. Again, people who believe this also believe that the cure for depression is to change your mindset and adopt a more positive outlook on life.

 

Depression and sadness are, in fact, two different entities. It is important to understand the differences between sadness and depression so that we can better understand those around us who struggle with it. Some of the main differences between sadness and depression are:

  • Sadness is usually triggered by a traumatic or difficult event, whereas depression does not need any external triggers.
  • Sadness is temporary, whereas depression lingers for extended periods of time.
  • Sadness is a distinct emotion, whereas depression is better described as a numbness to all emotions.

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“Talking About Depression Makes It Worse”

Many people believe that the more you focus on depression, the worse it will get. This belief is closely tied to the previous belief that depression is “all in your head,” and that a simple change in mindset will cure the victim of depression. This is, in fact, false, and it is one of the more dangerous misconceptions about depression.

 

Studies have strongly supported the theory that not talking about depression makes it worse, and that talking about depression with a psychologist or close friend or family member helps those who struggle with it more than most other treatments. Doctors often prescribe therapy sessions and antidepressants together when they are helping patients with depression.

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“Only Women Are Affected by Depression”

This belief is likely influenced by society’s emotional expectations for men. Because men are influenced by the media and other sources not to share their “negative” emotions, men are much less likely to make known their struggles with illnesses such as depression. Nevertheless, it is a popular belief that only women are affected by depression.

Dispelling Common Myths About Depression

The fact is that everybody can be affected by depression. Male or female, rich or poor, every human being has a chance of suffering from depression, and no group of people is immune. In the United States, it has been observed that males have died from suicidal attempts three to five times more often than women since the 1950s.

These statistics make it clear that women are definitely not the only gender that is affected by depression, and depression is a serious threat to both men and women alike. So don’t wait and make a call to a behavioral or mental health provider if your feeling longer then normal lengths of depression. 

Holiday Guest and Article by My Friends of Ohio for Responsible Gambling.

Holiday Guest and Article by My Friends of Ohio for Responsible Gambling.

Well, the holiday season has begun now that Thanksgiving has come and gone for 2018. And for those like me who maintain recovery from gambling addiction, we know this time of year can either be a Joyous time or time where Relapse can sure sneak up on us with family stress, not enough money for the holidays, or arguments with spouses or family members …

ALL of these and others can be possible Triggers for us no matter if your in early recovery, longer-term recovery, or just sitting on the fence thinking YOU may have a gambling problem. There are those WHO can gamble normally, but now with 2.9% of our population now problem gamblers? They need to know to gamble responsibly and if you can’t? See Help. But if you can NOT?

This is WHY I chose for my sixth year to be on HOLIDAY WATCH and SUPPORT as of Thanksgiving Eve through Jan 2nd, 2019 

THEN? I begin my recovery service to my buddy ” Big Jim Downs Recovery Foundation for a whole year as he embarks on a Journey of Hope biking all around America for all Addictions Awareness and Recovery. Check out the link above and see how you can be a part of  “The Biggest Ever Addiction Awareness Event” taking place in 48 States! I am social media and sponsorship Ambassador and it is going to be Amazing to see GOD work MIRACLES through Big Jim!

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Now, back to the article of gambling which IS one of the Addictions Jim will be advocating recovery for … I hope by sharing this article helps those who have not been “touched” by this cunning disease and maybe on the fence to IF they have a problem… ~Catherine

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We are in the thick of the holiday season, which often means family, food, fun, and free time. That extra time usually means more time for our hobbies and entertainment and, for those who like to gamble, it can also mean additional opportunities for betting.

 

More time to gamble can, for some, result in spending too much time and money at the casino. Online gambling can be especially tempting because it offers games running 24/7, which can be accessed from the comfort of your own home and gives gamblers a chance to try games at virtually any time.

If you’re planning to gamble this holiday season, here are seven things to keep in mind.

 

Seven Things to Remember Before You Gamble

  1. Gambling should only be for fun. It is not, and never will be, a way to invest or earn money.
  2. Always limit how much you are willing to lose, as well as how much time you spend gambling.
  3. When you get ahead, quit. Don’t feel pressured to gamble with winnings to win more; be satisfied that you came out ahead.
  4. Realize that you should be able to afford to lose any money you bet.
  5. Never gamble just because you are bored or to decrease stress.
  6. Maintain other interests and hobbies other than just gambling.
  7. If you lose money one-time gambling, don’t gamble another time with just the intent to win the money back. Once it’s gone, it’s gone.

 

There is absolutely nothing wrong with some gambling during the holidays unless you are in recovery, for those with slight or no problem remember to do so responsibly. If you feel like your gambling (or that of a loved one) is out of control, please click here for resources in your area.

Not Sure if you may have a problem with gambling? Click Here: QUIZ

And TAKE THE QUIZ

Answer the following questions about your gambling activity in the last 12 months and gauge your risk level for problem gambling.

GAMBLING PROBLEM? 1-800-589-9966

 

Learning Holiday Budgeting ~ Gambling Recovery Finance and Budgeting Advice By Guest Alek Sabin …

Learning Holiday Budgeting ~ Gambling Recovery Finance and Budgeting Advice By Guest Alek Sabin …

Now that the holiday season is here, for those recovering from gambling addiction may feel a little more stress over finances this time of year. We know this addiction is and was financially draining and emotionally. My guest Alek has some sound advice on how to keep it all together and share how to tighten our budget and keep some money over the holiday season.

Many of us doing our financial inventories may have worked hard to clean up our credit and get things back on track. But let us learn from Alek how to not go overboard as to running the risk of being once again burdened with loads of debt after the holidays.

 

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How to Tighten Your Budget Over the Holiday Season~by Alek Sabin

Coming into the holidays tends to generate a lot of excitement. There are all sorts of parties to go to, goodies to eat, and gifts to share. However, in the midst of this joyful season, your pocketbook is almost certainly going to take a bit of a hit. Indeed, the holidays can be so financially taxing that most financial experts recommend having a budget for the holidays that you save for throughout the rest of the year. However, you don’t need to go into the red this year, if you take some simple steps to help tighten your budget.

The key to enjoying the festivities without the added stress of going into debt is to be smart and plan ahead. Check out some of the following suggestions to keep your bank account happy for the rest of the year!

Make a List and Stick to It

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Take the time to think ahead and make a list of each of the people you want to buy presents for this year. Once you have a list, take your planning to the next level and decide what it is you would like to give them. This will be especially helpful in a variety of ways, including:

  • Removing the possibility of overspending or buying more presents for any one person than you intended.
  • Removing the risk of impulse purchases.
  • Allowing you to price shop so you can get the best deal on each gift, including giving you the chance to watch for special holiday sales.
  • Making sure you do not forget anyone and cause yourself additional stress.

 

Set Aside the Money

Once you have set a budget for the amount you are willing and able to spend on the holidays this year, find a way to set it aside. Easily keep track of your money now and throughout the year by employing these tips.

    • Set aside a special pot of money just for the holidays: Whether this is a bank account you put money in specifically for the holidays or a literal jar you have in your home that you periodically deposit money into, keep your holiday money separate from all of your other money. This will help you know exactly what you have available to spend and keep you from spending money that should be going toward more important things, like the mortgage and food.

 

  • Only use cash for your holiday spending: If you would rather draw the money out of your normal bank account, withdraw the money into cash and know that is all you have to spend. Being able to visually see the amount of money you have left to spend will help you to make economic choices. Once the money is gone, you are done spending for the holidays. 
  • Have a strict meal plan: Holiday parties and get-togethers are likely to boast large and delicious meals, and can cost a pretty penny (especially if you are hosting one yourself). However, you should make a point to ensure that the rest of your meals are more structured and less expensive, in order to save a buck or two (or more) for the rest of the holiday. Whether this includes cooking all of your meals at home or finding clever ways to save money when you eat out.

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Look for Alternatives to Purchased Gifts


If the wallet is tight this year, consider other options for gifts you may give rather than ones purchased in the store. For a neighbor, you may offer to walk their dog or shovel their sidewalks. If you are making holiday treats, make a few extra and take some treats to friends or to the office. Encourage children to be creative and make each other homemade gifts.


Let Someone Else Host This Year


While presents are a costly part of the holiday season, another stress on your finances is holiday parties and dinners. Purchasing the food, drinks, decorations, and outfits for these events while entertaining can quickly add up to a pretty penny. Consider allowing (or even asking!) someone else to host the party this year. If you still find yourself playing host, look for ways to ease the burden on yourself by making it a potluck meal or a BYOB …

Save Your Receipts


By saving all of your receipts, you can then log your spending when you get home in a notebook or spreadsheet. This will help you to keep a running total and assist in staying within your budget. Another less thought of a reason for keeping receipts is that some stores will reimburse you for the difference if an item goes on sale after you purchase it. While this is not true of all stores, it never hurts to ask and you will need your receipt to get your money back!

 

Happy Recovery Holiday Season!