My Weekend Recovery Guest~Welcome Massachusettes Council on Compulsive Gambling

Welcome Recovery Friends, Seekers, and New Visitors,

I’m very happy and honored to “Welcome” my good recovery friends from: “Massachusetts Council on Compulsive Gambling” as my Weekend Recovery Guest! They truly help many problem compulsive gamblers, a fantastic recovery resource, and have help and information for the gamblers family.
Here is a little about who they are, what they offer, and how they help MANY!

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Massachusetts Council on Compulsive Gambling:

Founded in 1983, the Massachusetts Council on Compulsive Gambling is a private, non-profit health agency dedicated to providing leadership to reduce the social, financial, and emotional costs of problem gambling, and to promote a continuum of prevention and intervention strategies including: information and public awareness, community education and professional training, advocacy and referral services for problem gamblers, their loved ones and the greater community. http://www.masscompulsivegambling.org

*Services Offered include:*

Prevention

Information

Education & Training

Advocacy

Referral / Helpline
*Now your most likely wondering, what is Addicted Compulsive Gambling? Even though I share much about this addiction, disease, illness, for my New Visitors, here is a little more info:,
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What is Problem Gambling?

The information on this site comes from recent studies within the problem gambling research field. For further details, please Contact the Council …..
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Virtually anyone – men or women, young or old, from every religion, race and socio-economic background – can be at risk for developing a gambling problem.
Research has estimated that approximately one half of 1%(0.42 to 0.6%) of the U.S. population has experienced pathological gambling in their lifetime, and 0.9 to 2.3% have experienced sub-clinical pathological gambling in their lifetimes. The Mass. Council recognizes that approximately 2-3% of the state’s population has experienced disordered gambling in their lifetimes.
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The most serious form of problem gambling is pathological gambling, the essential feature of which is “persistent and recurrent maladaptive behavior that disrupts personal, family or vocational pursuits.”(American Psychiatric Association – DSM-IV)…..
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Compulsive gambling can result in social, emotional and financial devastation, including loss of relationships, residence, emotional or physical health, and career or educational opportunities.
Some compulsive gamblers commit illegal acts to support their gambling or to pay off gambling-related debts. Some go to prison or are admitted to psychiatric institutions. It is not uncommon to hear about compulsive gamblers who attempt or commit suicide.
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To learn more about the signs of problem gambling , the relationship between problem gambling and substance use or the prevalence of gambling please click the appropriate link.

Each year, the Council holds several regional trainings, as well as an annual conference. For more information, please visit the calendar of events
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*Here are some Facts & Stats from Mass~ Council*

GAMBLING PREVALENCE RATES:

Research has estimated the number of U.S. citizens who gamble as well as the number who experience pathological and sub-clinical pathological gambling.

Gambling rates: Research has estimated that nearly 80% of U.S. population has gambled during his or her lifetime.

Pathological and sub-clinical pathological gambling rates: Research has estimated that approximately one half of 1%(0.42 to 0.6%) of the U.S. population has experienced pathological gambling in their lifetime, and 0.9 to 2.3% have experienced sub-clinical pathological gambling in their lifetimes.

The Mass. Council recognizes that approximately 2-3% of the state’s population has experienced disordered gambling in their lifetimes.

Pathological and problem gambling in Massachusetts: Based on national estimates, between 85,000 and 185,000 Massachusetts residents likely have experienced disordered gambling during their lifetimes.

OTHER DISORDERS WITH PREVALENCE RATES SIMILAR TO DISORDERED GAMBLING:

The 2-3% lifetime prevalence rate estimate of disordered gambling is significant. Research has estimated the lifetime prevalence rates of other equally serious public health disorders. Listed below are some substance use and mental health disorders with rate estimates that are relatively close to the rate estimates of disordered gambling.

  • Opioid use disorder (e.g., oxycontin, morphine): 1.4%7
  • Cocaine use disorder: 2.8%7
  • Amphetamine use disorder (e.g., methamphetamine): 2.0%8
  • Anti-social personality disorder: 3.6%8
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder: 1.6%9
  • Schizophrenic disorders: 0.6%10
  • Anorexia nervosa: 0.6%11
  • Bulimia nervosa: 1.0%11
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    **SO FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT MASS COUNCIL ON COMPULSIVE GAMBLING, PLEASE GO BY AND VISIT THEIR WEBSITE FOR ALL CONTACT INFO, EVENTS, SERVICE’S THEY OFFER, AS THEY GO OUT OF THEIR WAY TO HELP THOSE WHO REACH OUT FOR HELP, & HELP THE FAMILIES AS WELL**
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    *AND AS ALWAYS, PLEASE LET THEM KNOW THAT *AUTHOR, CATHERINE TOWNSEND-LYON SENT YOU!
    PLEASE FOLLOW THEM ON TWITTER  @MASSCOUNCILCG
    FACEBOOK:   http://www.facebook.com/MACouncil/
    AND GO GIVE A VISIT TO THIER BLOG,
    AND A BIT ABOUT IT:  http://masscouncil.blogspot.com
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    About Me
    My Photo

    Boston, Massachusetts, United States
    Founded in 1983, the Massachusetts Council on Compulsive Gambling is a private, non-profit public health agency dedicated to providing leadership to reduce the social, financial, and emotional costs of problem gambling and to promote a continuum of prevention and intervention strategies including: information and public awareness, community education and professional training, advocacy, and help line / referral services for problem gamblers, their loved ones and the greater community.

    *God Bless & Happy Holidays Everyone*
    Author, Catherine Townsend-Lyon
    “Addicted To Dimes” http://www.amazon.com/dp/0984478485

     

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