*I Lost a Sister-In-Law & Aunt to Prescription OVERDOSE & SUICIDE ~~ So I Felt The Need To Share*…..

Hello friends, followers, and Seekers,

**In these recent weeks and month’s we have LOST way to any PRECIOUS LIVES to Prescription Overdose, Suicide, Alcohol, and MUCH more! I happen to come across this Article that I felt  IMPORTANT to share. Even though my *DEMON* I am recovering from is “Addicted Compulsive Gambling” & a past of a few to many Cocktails now & then, ADDICTION does comes in Many Forms.

I was touched by Prescription Overdose recently by the DEATH of My Sister-in-Law this past Nov. 2012, and also in the late 70’s, of my Aunt Connie as well. SO I understand how devastating it is for those who lose a Loved One from this disease. It just breaks my heart of all those we have lost lately in the *Entertainment Industry,* and goes to show that EVEN with Money and Fame, we are all JUST Humans trying to survive, and are NOT that far apart in deep-rooted demons and addictions that have NO BOUNDS on WHO it will TAKE!……I think we can agree that Money nor Fame will not fill the Dark Whole inside our hearts when we turn to addiction. So I hope this Article will help all!!**……….

When Relapse Turns Deadly: What You Need to Know About Drug Overdose

Posted: 07/22/2013  6:33 pm

Psychiatrist and CEO of Elements Behavioral Health…..

Friends and fans are reeling in the wake of Glee actor Cory Monteith’s overdose on a mixture of heroin and alcohol. Suffering a similar fate as Kriss Kross rapper Chris Kelly and others who have passed this year, his lengthy battle with drugs ended tragically on July 13 in his hotel room.

Could his story have ended differently? What can others learn from this tragedy? Monteith’s passing highlights important lessons for anyone who struggles with addiction or cares about an addict (which, with 23 million people suffering from addiction, is most of us).

While celebrity overdoses draw the public’s attention, 100 people die from drug overdoses every day in the U.S. After increasing every year from 1999 to 2010, drug overdose is now the No. 1 cause of accidental death, surpassing car accidents. This increase is largely attributed to the epidemic of prescription painkiller abuse. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently warned that more women are dying from prescription painkiller overdoses than ever before, a 400 percent increase in just the last decade.

A Post-Rehab Danger

It is a sad irony that rehab is life-saving, yet the weeks and months immediately following checkout are among the most vulnerable times in an addict’s recovery. It can take up to a year for the areas of the brain responsible for impulse control and emotion regulation to return to normal functioning. In addition, people are often still struggling with powerful drug cravings and then return to an environment where they are surrounded by reminders of their drug use.

Particularly when addicts receive short-term treatment (30 days or less), they haven’t had much time to address the issues underlying their addiction or practice their new coping skills. Old, familiar coping strategies remain far more comfortable and automatic. A recovering addict who thinks they’ve got their drug problem under control after a short stay in rehab is likely to return to life as usual rather than creating a new life in recovery, greatly increasing the risk of relapse.

Relapse is part of the disease of addiction. Many people go on to achieve lasting recovery following one or more slips. However, in the weeks and months following a stay in rehab, addicts need a great deal of education and support not only to protect their recovery but also their lives. The risk of accidental overdose rises sharply during this time, largely because of reduced tolerance.

People who use a drug regularly develop a tolerance for it; that is, they require larger doses to get the same effects. Just as quickly, tolerance can diminish. After even a brief period of abstinence, which often takes place in detox, rehab or prison, the brain becomes less accustomed to — or less tolerant of — the presence of drugs. As a result of this increased sensitivity, if an addict goes back to the same dose they used prior to rehab, they are at high risk of fatal overdose.

Most overdoses occur when multiple drugs are abused, most commonly alcohol, benzodiazepines such as Valium and Xanax, cocaine and heroin. Illicit drugs are often implicated in drug overdoses because their potency is unpredictable and they reach the brain rapidly. Other risk factors for drug overdose include taking drugs alone (two-thirds of overdoses occur when a person is using at home alone) and having experienced a non-fatal overdose in the past.

Most overdoses occur because the drugs that are used stopped the person’s breathing. This effect is most profound with opiates (drugs similar to morphine and heroin, including prescription painkillers). Overdoses due to prescription drugs now exceed all other causes and the tragedy is that many of these can be prevented by a simple and safe medicine that blocks the effects of opiates on breathing.

One approach is a medication called naltrexone. Naltrexone can be given as a single monthly injection (Vivitrol) that virtually abolishes the risk of an accidental overdose in someone who uses after treatment. Why isn’t this being used more often? The answer is complex. Many recovering drug users don’t accept that they remain vulnerable to relapse. Family members don’t want to “make an issue” of going on Vivitrol when their relative is doing so much better at the end of treatment. Relapse is perceived by many as a choice, so they don’t believe a drug can make a difference.

The reality is that Vivitrol helps in two important ways: It decreases drug cravings, making relapse less likely, and it prevents an accidental overdose if the person slips so that a single bad choice does not become a death sentence.

A Long-Term Approach to a Lifelong Problem

Although many people believe that going to rehab is a permanent solution to a drug problem, it is actually the start of a lifelong process — a process that often involves an intricate dance of forward and backward progress. Relapse can’t always be prevented, but accidental drug overdose can. So what can be done?

The only sure-fire way to prevent overdose is to avoid using drugs. However, refraining from mixing drugs, using drugs alone, or using at the same level as before a period of abstinence are essential once the decision to use has been made. Loved ones can work with addicts on an overdose plan that covers who to call and what to do in the moments before relapse.

Follow-up care is another important protective factor. As a chronic disease similar to diabetes and heart disease, addiction requires ongoing care. Research shows that long-term treatment (90 days or more) improves outcomes, especially if the addict makes a gradual transition back into regular life. This may involve outpatient treatment, ongoing therapy, support groups or a sober living home.

Drug overdoses are among the most tragic outcomes of addiction. For most people, relapse is not the end of recovery; it’s another step on the journey. But those who accidentally overdose — often people who are sincerely trying to get better — make one miscalculation and suffer the only fate that means hope is lost.

David Sack, M.D., is board-certified in psychiatry, addiction psychiatry and addiction medicine. He is CEO of Elements Behavioral Health, a network of mental health and addiction treatment centers that includes Promises, The Ranch, Right Step, The Recovery Place, The Sexual Recovery…..

**This really is an Interesting and helpful Article. Many Don’t understand about *Compulsive Gambling*  as well because it’s not only Everywhere, but it is SO SOCIALLY ACCEPTABLE, and think it’s all ABOUT the Little Old Lady going to Play BINGO at here local Church!! But it is *The FASTEST Growing Addiction Today! GAMBLING addiction has the HIGHEST SUICIDE RATE than any other addiction…..AND…..out of the 16+ Million Problem Gamblers in only the USA, “HALF” that Number are now late TEENS & Young College age students and young adults…….

IS this ACCEPTABLE to YOU PARENTS??…….I didn’t think so. Please see my List of Post s & PAGES  *About Addicted Compulsive Gambling* to learn more about this Cunning Disease. Being in a very dark place a couple of times myself, I can truly understand how people can get to a real low bottom, even without addiction problems.

**UPDATE AS OF MON 8/19/2013/ 5:26PM Pacific Time**** ANOTHER STARS LIGHT DIMMED TODAY A FEW HOURS AGO****

Image: Lee Thompson Young as Det. Barry Frost in the TV series 'Rizzoli & Isles' (© Darren Michaels/TNT/AP)
  • Stars mourn loss of Lee Thompson Young
                                Photo: ME1/WENN

    Entertainment Tonight

    Lee Thompson Young, who starred on Disney’s “The Famous Jett Jackson,” was found dead Monday morning of an apparent suicide by gunshot, police confirm to ET.

    He was 29 years old.

    Police responded at about 9:45 a.m. Monday. According to reports, his body was discovered by his landlord who was alerted by staffers from TNT’s “Rizzoli & Isles,” in which Young currently appears, when he didn’t show up to work this morning.

    Aside from his most famous role as Jett Jackson, Young also had a role as running back Chris Comer in “Friday Night Lights.”

    “It is with great sadness that I announce that Lee Thompson Young tragically took his own life this morning,” longtime manager Jonathan Baruch said on Monday. “Lee was more than just a brilliant young actor, he was a wonderful and gentle soul who will be truly missed. We ask that you please respect the privacy of his family and friends at this very difficult time.”

    At the time of his death, Young was working on TNT’s Rizzoli & Isles as Detective Barry Frost.

    LAPD Media Relations tells E! News, “Lee Thompson Young’s coworkers noticed that he didn’t turn up to work this morning. They sent the police to his home in North Hollywood. The police arrived a little after 8 a.m. and found him deceased in his apartment. They have not released the cause of death yet.”

    According to Police, Young’s body was found at his residence with a gun-shot wound that appeared to be self-inflicted.

    “Everyone at Rizzoli & Isles is devastated by the news of the passing of Lee Thompson Young. We are beyond heartbroken at the loss of this sweet, gentle, good-hearted, intelligent man. He was truly a member of our family. Lee will be cherished and remembered by all who knew and loved him, both on- and off screen, for his positive energy, infectious smile and soulful grace. We send our deepest condolences and thoughts to his family, to his friends and, most especially, to his beloved mother.”

    **ANOTHER SAD LOSS OF PRESIOUS LIFE……MY HEART AND PRAYERS GO OUT TO HIS FAMILY At this time of sorrow. WORDS can NEVER Express the feelings and thoughts of loss like this…….It HAS BEEN A WAKE CALL for myself, Again If I’d been successful in Both my Suicide Attempts, I NOW SEE CLEARLY HOW IT EFFECTS EVERYONE YOU LOVE THAT IS AROUND YOU……I’m at a Loss for Words…..**
    *AUTHOR, CATHERINE TOWNSEND-LYON*

7 thoughts on “*I Lost a Sister-In-Law & Aunt to Prescription OVERDOSE & SUICIDE ~~ So I Felt The Need To Share*…..

  1. That’s VERY TRUE!! That’s why I have a *Relapse Prevention Guide* PAGE here on my Blog.
    It’s what I have used in my Recovery from compulsive gambling. ANYONE can copy & paste to
    your computer, Laptop…Just take the word GAMLING and they Insert the addiction they are
    Recovering from…..It works for all Addictions! Thanks for your thoughts & Visit! Catherine 🙂

    Like

  2. Thank you for this, Catherine. I like a lot about what the article states, esp. about relapse being a part of the illness, and NOT recovery. I hear that line about relapse being a part of recovery, and it’s BS. Nowhere does it say we relapse to recover. And thank you for bringing attention to gambling. Yes, it’s more socially acceptable, as workaholics are accepted, as both don’t seem to have major issues. We do tend to think of that old lady going to the bingo hall, and yet we don’t see that dire consequences – you mention suicide being a huge thing. I don’t have gambling in my story, but I see some feverish people lining up and doing their thing in the line for lotto tickets. They may not be addicts, per se, but their activity reminds me of mine when in the liquor store line up…and those dead eyes. Anyway, I am the last to diagnose, having no experience in this, but I am learning from you in terms of what it’s like to have that illness manifest itself through gambling. Killer.

    Thank you for this and your generosity in sharing. 🙂

    Blessings,
    Paul

    Like

    • Your Welcome Paul…..I just came to update AGAIN ANOTHER BLOG POST, to ADD another Actor Died of Suicide a few hours ago!! I’m at a LOSS for WORDS! When is this going to STOP??? He was only in his 20’s??? WOW
      Thanks for coming by Paul! Just doing my *SHARING -N- Caring* Cat 🙂

      Like

  3. catherine,im here..i have been down both roads suicide and overdose,if you need me please reach out,my prayers are with you and your families,as many may feel prayer is of no help,it is for the survivors and the person the world has lost. I think your amazing and such a inspiration to many.Blessing my friend all my love ,cheri

    Like

    • Thanks Cheri,
      It really does help, I just hate the thought of having to give my babies/Kitty’s away and I really
      don’t want to leave So. Oregon! But if my Fundraiser doesn’t reach it’s goal, looks like we have no choice but
      move to Arizona and stay with Tom’s family until my SSI-Benefits kick in in a month 1/2…..We were just trying to hang on here until then 😦 I do accept ALL PRAYERS….God Made a MIRACLE OF ME IN RECOVERY!! He still does give Blessings & MIRACLES>>> HUGS! CAT

      Like

      • I know,moving to Mississippi,1200 miles from my oldest is agony,but what is needed,i know your heart is aching for all the sacrifices you have to make,im with you in my daily thoughts and prayers hugs cheri 🙂

        Like

      • AND….with tears in my eyes, WE thank you for your Support, Understanding, and thoughts & Prayers 🙂
        I guess the good lord wants us to TRULY learn the real lessons of stating over with nothing…..but..that’s OK because I know he has a PLAN for us in all this DRAMA….I won’t give up on HIM! Hugs! CAT

        Like

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